HTML5

HTML5 is the latest version of Hypertext Markup Language, the code that describes web pages. It's actually three kinds of code: HTML, which provides the structure; Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), which take care of presentation; and JavaScript, which makes things happen.

HTML5 has been designed to deliver almost everything you'd want to do online without requiring additional software such as browser plugins. It does everything from animation to apps, music to movies, and can also be used to build incredibly complicated applications that run in your browser.

HTML5 isn't proprietary and it is cross-platform. You don't pay for it and it runs everywhere from the tablet or a smartphone, a netbook, notebook or ultrabook or a Smart TV: if your browser supports HTML5, it should work flawlessly. Inevitably, it's a bit more complicated than that. More about that in a moment.

We've come a long way since HTML could barely handle a simple page layout. HTML5 can be used to write web applications that still work when you're not connected to the net; to tell websites where you are physically located; to handle high definition video; and to deliver extraordinary graphics.

One of the major changes in HTML5 is in respect to how HTML addresses Web applications. Other new features in HTML5 include specific functions for embedding graphics, audio, video, and interactive documents.  New elements also allow you to define sections of your Web page using new tags such as < article > which defines an article, < nav > which defines navigation links, < source > which defines media resources, and many others. For example, the navigation section of your page would be enclosed in the < nav > tags.

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